Decision Making and Risk Management in Adventure Sports Coaching

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
modal close image
modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.

modal header
Academic Research

Loel Collins & Dave Collins, Institute of Coaching and Performance, School of Sport, Tourism and the Outdoors, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom

Risk management is an essential element of a coach’s skill set (Ferrero, 2007) and, reflecting this central role, the topic plays a small but significant part in the vast majority of coach education programs (cf. British Canoe Union, 2007). For the outdoor professional, however, risk management is a more subtle and wider ranging skill (Collins & Collins, 2012). This distinction presents challenges for the Adventure Sports Coach (ASC) who must optimally manage the inherent risks associated with Adventure Sports (AS), such as rock climbing, mountaineering, sea kayaking, white water kayaking, canoeing and caving, against the longer term developmental needs and shorter term stated goals of clients.